Tsetsegee


Basic information
Interviewee ID: 990279
Name: Tsetsegee
Parent's name: Gombojamts
Ovog: Hatagin
Sex: f
Year of Birth: 1949
Ethnicity: Halh

Additional Information
Education: higher
Notes on education:
Work: retired
Belief: Buddhist
Born in: Sühbaatar sum, Ulaanbaatar aimag
Lives in: Chingeltei sum (or part of UB), Ulaanbaatar aimag
Mother's profession: [blank]
Father's profession: [blank]


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work; foreign relations; family; military; urban issues;

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Summary of Interview 090727B with Tsetsegee


Note: this is a combined summary for interview parts 090727A and 090727B.


Gombojamtsyn Tsetsegee is the daughter of the People’s Revolutionary partisan Banzragchiin Gombojamts. He is from Shaamar, in Selenge. The Selenge aimag people have been active participants of the People’s Revolution. Gombojamts joined the people’s militia and he pursued the Chinese revolutionaries. During the Halh Gol war in 1939 he used to drive a small truck imported from the Soviet Union and which was called a ‘knot’ by the Mongolians. He used to transport armaments and goods by that truck. He drove the car of the delegate who had come from the city to arrest Dambiijaa.


Tsetsegee is the only adopted daughter of a family. She graduated the secondary school number two named after Sühbaatar with a golden medal, and then she entered the math class of the Teacher’s Institute and graduated from it. It’s interesting how she worked at the state farm harvesting grain while she was a student. There were many state farms in the socialist period, and the students often went to harvest. There were plenty of grain and vegetables, and the storehouses were also good. Tsetsegee’s life history is also very interesting.


She is the only child of a pampered family. She was one of ten of thousands of people who were involved in hard labor in foreign countries in the first grave years of the shift to a market economy. Though she retired, she was never just sitting around.


She said she meditated and she went to the healthy eating club. She drew in others to the clubs.