Barhüü


Basic information
Interviewee ID: 990454
Name: Barhüü
Parent's name: Shirendev
Ovog: Delgerhaan uul
Sex: f
Year of Birth: 1929
Ethnicity: Halh

Additional Information
Education: none
Notes on education:
Work: retired
Belief: Buddhist
Born in: Tsetserleg sum, Hövsgöl aimag
Lives in: Mörön sum (or part of UB), Hövsgöl aimag
Mother's profession: herder
Father's profession: herder


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family; cultural campaigns; repressions; belief; collectivization;

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Summary of Interview 091053A with Barhüü


I was born in 1929, and is a citizen of Tsetserleg sum. I come from a family of herders that goes back at three generations. When I was a child, we did everything together including combing, making felt, and raising a child. If anyone caught a cold or had a headache, we were told to take a boiled gentian herb instead of going to a doctor and taking medicine. We were very strong and stalwart, and went to look after the sheep barefooted when the snow was only starting to melt. I was only six when they arrested one of my father’s relatives who was a high-ranking monk. I saw two horsemen with guns drive him like an animal between them and I told to my parents about it. He had many items including offerings with silver trimmings. They destroyed them when they arrested him. He put many of them in the mountains and put some more in a rocky chasm. It was difficult to hide icons and religious books because they checked carefully in the drawers and tables where normally he kept the religious books. Some people were able to hide their main items of worship. People were saying that many monks of our Tes monastery were murdered in the north valley and it was looked yellowish from the far.


My spouse was busy with the collective’s business and was not able to stay at home. I used to milk twenty-seven or twenty-eight cows, got up at 4am in the morning, milked the mares when the mares were caught; I also milked sheep, as many as there were there and sheared their wool and processed milk products. I had no livestock and got some while I was tending the collective's livestock. Many people did same thing and became a 'Champion good herder'.